Friday = drinking day? What the *&%! is a 'standard drink' anyway??

What do you do at the end of a long week...perhaps unwind with a beer or wine? Kick back, relax with friends, have 'one more' and 'just one more' after that to release the stress of the week?

We're back into the swing of things at work and it is very tempting to throw back a few drinks at the end of the week, isn't it? I mean, after all, if you're like me, you've been really good all week! You didn't drink much during the week, you ate well, you went to the gym...there's nothing wrong with a wine or two....right?

 

alcoholandstress

 

I'm the same. I also enjoy a glass or two of wine with my husband on the weekend now and then...but after seeing this, I might be re-thinking exactly how full my glass is (the one with alcohol in it, anyway!), or how many glasses I have.

It is interesting to watch this little experiment (Is Binge Drinking That Bad, 2016) with identical twins. For one month, they each drink the U.K.'s recommended intake of alcohol per week, one at a moderate pace over the week, and the other all at once, binge-drinking style. The results are admittedly funny, and also a little terrifying. Most interesting of all, *spoiler!* is that they both had major changes in their blood work from baseline after 4 weeks, in areas such as liver inflammation and systemic inflammation, and more - with systemic inflammation, the body behaves as if it is fighting a virus - perhaps the cause of that fuzzy headed feeling. So, clearly it's not the greatest news. More changes were noted in their blood tests, but you'll have to watch to see for yourself.

Also very interesting is that they were both only drinking the U.K.'s recommended intake! They were not drinking any more than what was recommended as safe.

 

Caveats:

1. The U.K. recently reviewed those guidelines and changes were made to the recommendations. It is important to note that in this show, they were drinking the recommended intake before (Arnett, 2016) the changes recently made, i.e. they made the show before the changes came out, following the older guidelines. Still, their findings are very interesting and it is worth considering your own intake compared to theirs, and also how it changes from country to country.

2, Also, to be fair, it should be stated that this is not a scientifically valid experiment, especially with only 2 subjects! The conclusion that can be drawn from it is that, for their particular body composition, the U.K.'s formerly recommended alcohol intake is actually not sufficient for them to avoid long-term liver damage. Quite a sobering thing to discover, isn't it? - yes, pun intended! Their results also beg the question, if this is true for these two people, how many others is it also true for? And, will the new changes to the U.K. guidelines be enough for the majority of people?

Ok, so what are the recommended guidelines and how are they shown?

Well, as you probably know, women are generally recommended to drink less than men, because we metabolise alcohol in a different way to men due to our higher body fat composition.

The recommendations are presented as units, where one unit = 10 grams of alcohol, however I have read here (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015) that the U.S. guidelines take a standard unit to be 14 grams of alcohol so...not sure what to say about that, except that it is best to research the advice for your particular country to be sure.

The number of units recommended varies from country to country actually, and those variations are really surprising! As a guide of what a standard drink actually equates to, a small (125 ml) glass of wine is 1.6 units, a bottle of wine is about 10 units, a 25 ml shot of spirits is 1 unit, and a pint of beer is 2.3 units (Change for Life, 2016).

 

Here's the breakdown for Australia, the U.K., and the U.S.A.

Australia:

Women = 14

Men = 14

* and no more than 4 standard drinks at any one time.

Here's some further information (Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council, 2015) on the alcohol guidelines from the Australian Government. I also found this super cool organisation (Hello Sunday Morning, 2016) through www.alcohol.gov.au. They've created an app that is designed to help you change your relationship with alcohol, join like-minded people, and share your hangover-free Sundays. Loving this as it totally aligns with my concept of Sunrise-ing Well through making better lifestyle choices. Here is the app for iPhone, not sure if there is an Android version. You can also find their Facebook page here.

 

U.K.: ---> NEWS! The Guidelines were changed since the doco was made! So they were right when they predicted in the show that the amount of alcohol per week would be reduced. The changes were made in early January and now stand as:

Women = 14 units or less per week

Men = 14 units or less per week

Here's a nice little graphic display (Change For Life, 2016) of how much that actually translates to based on alcohol type in the U.K.

Notice how there is no difference in the recommendations for men or women?

 

U.S.A.:

Women = 7 units or less per week (in Australian/U.K. terms that works out to almost 10 standard drinks)

Men = 14 units or less per week (almost 20 standard drinks in the Australian/U.K. equivalent)

*Note that the U.S. measurement of a unit is higher than that of the U.K. or Australia so I've given the rough equivalent above. Here's a link (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015) to more on this.

So what does this mean for you and me? Well, look, I'll be honest...I don't drink more than a standard glass every now and then these days, and after looking into it, I'd say I'll be cutting back even more!

What about you? Can you see yourself cutting your intake back a little? A lot? For many it is not as easy as just saying you will stop or cut back and hey presto it's done. There are many factors that need to be considered before making a commitment to cut back. In my one-on-one coaching sessions, I help you to identify the areas you need to address in your life in order to make the changes you want to make. For example, it may be that you need to work on improving or changing your habits in the area of relationships, or how you deal with stress, before you can tackle the goal of reducing alcohol. Together we can identify the areas where you are stuck and build a strategy towards change. Making huge commitments in short periods of time runs the risk of rebound and bingeing even more, so I encourage you to start slow and build up as your confidence grows. 

Plus - big news! - I haven't made any official announcement yet, but I am planning to run a group coaching program to help you 'Stress Less and Live More'! This could be the perfect opportunity to start reducing your alcohol intake with a group of people supporting and sharing the journey. Keep your eye out for my posts and contact me if you are interested in finding out more...exciting!!

If you'd like to chat with me about your goals around alcohol or any other health habit, I offer a free 15 minute Discovery Call where we can discuss the areas you want to change. The call is totally risk-free and can give you a chance to hone in on what's important for you. Use my contact form here to get in touch and set up your call.
 

xo

 

References:

Arnett, G. 2016 'How do the UK's new alcohol guidelines compare with the rest of the world's?', The Guardian, 8 January 2016, viewed 29 January 2016, <http://www.theguardian.com/news/datablog/2016/jan/08/how-do-the-uks-new-alcohol-guidelines-compare-with-the-rest-of-the-worlds>

Australian Government National Health and Medical Research Council, 2015 Alcohol Guidelines: Reducing the Health Risks, NHMRC, viewed 29 January 2016, <https://www.nhmrc.gov.au/health-topics/alcohol-guidelines>

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2015, Alcohol and Public Health: Frequently Asked Questions, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, viewed 29 January 2016, <http://www.cdc.gov/alcohol/faqs.htm>

Change For Life, 2016, Alcohol Units and Guidelines, Change for Life, viewed 29 January 2016, <http://www.nhs.uk/change4life/Pages/alcohol-lower-risk-guidelines-units.aspx>

Hello Sunday Morning, 2016, Hello Sunday Morning, viewed 29 January 2016, <https://www.hellosundaymorning.org/>

 

Disclaimer: This blog post is intended to share publicly available information and assist you in making informed choices for improved health. It in no way replaces the guidance of your GP or health provider. If you feel your alcohol intake is unsafe or dangerous, or that you are suffering from alcohol addiction, please see your GP for medical assistance right away.